by Posture Editions

Dark Empathy
Shirley Villavicencio Pizango
Posture Editions - 38.00€ -

Shirley Villavicencio Pizango (b. 1988, Lima) is a Ghent-based artist with Peruvian roots. The cross-fertilization between her childhood in the Amazon jungle and Lima on the one hand, and her life in Belgium on the other, fundamentally characterizes her work.

Her young oeuvre consists of still lifes with terracotta vases, fruits or plants and decorative, colourful backgrounds. She also paints scenes for which mostly friends or family sit as models. Though it may seem that Shirley’s scenes are anchored in reality, the scenes on canvas have never taken place as a whole and her models have been transformed into characters in a constructed setting, where they are quietly allowed to be vulnerable or simply who they are.

Even the clothes and patterns are usually imaginary. Colours sometimes run; some parts appear to be left unfinished or blank.

Posture Editions N° 47, ‘Dark Empathy’, is a multi-layered hardcover presenting a selection of paintings from the last three years, interspersed with powerful drawings on paper and photographs of the artist in her studio. Bart Cassiman collected quotes to accompany the work and added some well-chosen observations by himself. The text ‘Inspired imagination’ by Benedicte Goesaert is the result of a frank conversation between the author and the expressive, generous, self-confident, but at times also melancholy artist.

"White lips refer to my memories of those moments I could not communicate with anyone because I did not yet master the Dutch language. At that time, I made drawings in which the mouth was altogether absent. Later it regained its place. The lips are often serenely pressed together because I want to immortalize the characters. For me, laughter is linked to the ephemerality of a moment. I find it fascinating to have the characters wait quietly without clear indication of what they are waiting for."
— Shirley Villavicencio Pizango in: Benedicte Goesaert, ‘Inspired Imagination’.

Bernice Bobs Her Hair
Natasja Mabesoone
Posture Editions - 35.00€ -

‘Bernice Bobs Her Hair’ is a series of layered soft ground etchings, drawings and monotypes. The title is a nod towards a Fitzgerald story about Bernice, who changes her approach to traditional gender roles and youth over a visit to her niece Marjorie. The act of having her hair cut transforms her character into a real flapper and brings her to a new perception of femininity.

Starting from the biased idea and normative use of marginalised graphic procedures as a means of reproduction, the idea of repetition is explored so that iterations become alterations or modifications of the same.

Simultaneously, associations cease to exist and the pregnant B, punning at times, as form and counterform encloses the work.

Fluid figures, painterly gestures and cartoonish scrawls and patterns are subject to a reflection on cuteness, power (-lessness), sexuality and domesticity.

By highlighting marginalised modes of artistic practice and craft-informed techniques, Mabesoone recoups visual languages that have habitually been coded as ultra-feminine and trivial. She questions how these ambiguous and subversive aesthetics can gain authority, and destabilise or resist contemporary realities and dominant cultural constructions.

The book contains poems by Veva Leye and a republication of ‘Trimmings’ by Harryette Mullen.

Nº 44 / August 2021

Rainbow Woman
Femmy Otten
Posture Editions - 38.00€ -

In her work, Dutch artist Femmy Otten (°1981) explores a very hybrid world of inspiration, ranging from sculptures from Greek antiquity and Italian painters of the quattrocento to American outsider art and contemporary art. She brings all these influences together in a precise yet unfathomable iconography.

The book Rainbow Woman shows mainly recent work, but also revisits a number of older works which Otten has regularly placed in a new context throughout her artistic practice and which have now also been given a new shape in the context of the exhibition in the Warande, Turnhout (01.08-07.11.2021).

Rainbow Woman shows Otten as a versatile painter, sculptor, draughtsman and performer. In ‘Donna Universale’, the art historian Leen Huet places Otten in a tradition of self-confident, female artists that Europe has known since the early Renaissance but who have only sporadically entered the history books as artistically accomplished artists. 

The book has many points of contact with the exhibition Rainbow Woman but can also be seen as a sequel to the artist’s book Slow Down Love (2016, nai).

Nº 45 / September 2021

Horaizon
Meggy Rustamova
Posture Editions - 38.00€ -

Meggy Rustamova’s (b. 1985) practice explores films and spatial installations, in which she incorporates photographs, essays and audio material; often the work has a performative character. Concerned with the relations between individual and collective memory, language and human behaviour, her works look for ways to translate the current matters and phenomena in the world.
The title of the book and the exhibition, HORAIZON, refers to the phonetic pronunciation of the English word ‘horizon’, the boundary line on which the earth’s surface and the sky seem to touch. The horizon, interpreted as ‘boundary’ or ‘line’, is equally perceptible in language, when reading between the lines, or when travelling between international borders. The contours of the land, trees or buildings, which contrast with the sky, but also the contours of shadows can be observed in many of the images in the exhibition. The works also suggest a longing for what lies behind the horizon and invite the viewer to make an imaginary journey.

On the occasion of Rustamova’s exhibition at the Vrienden v/h S.M.A.K. and the book ‘Horaizon’, the artist created a multiple. The multiple is entitled 1000 km in Vogelvlucht — 621.371 miles at Bird’s Eye View and unfolds as a storyboard, with a collection of sky views and birds the artist has captured over the past two years. From a condor in Arizona to the black-backed gulls in Iceland in the North Atlantic Ocean all through the Sea of Marmara, the book seeks to create a tale that reflects on a person’s daily need for freedom, travel and nature.

Nº 36 / September 2020

Morning Change
Heide Hinrichs
Posture Editions - 35.00€ -

Morning Change is a book on movement, location and nomadism in the oeuvre of the Brussels based German artist Heide Hinrichs (b. 1976). It is an invitation to follow different lines that are directed east — east of Kassel, east of Busan, east of Seattle, east of London. The lines are drawn over continents and oceans, against the Earth’s own movement we unconsciously witness with each sunrise. Within the traces of these lines, static objects are put back into motion and they are made to leave their recommended positions of meaning. 
The publication brings together three groups of works, developed over different periods of time between 1999 and 2018, exploring the artist’s recurring interest in these topics. 

the horse — a story that starts 10 year after the fall of the Iron Curtain, Silent Sisters / Stille Schwestern together with a series of drawings and installations that were conceived in response to DICTEE — a text written by the Korean-American artist Theresa Hak Kyung Cha and On Some of the Birds of Nepal (Parting the Animal Kingdom of the East) — an installation that Hinrichs created in the context of the first Kathmandu Triennale 2017.

An essay by Elizabeth Haines is woven through Morning Change.

Nº 33 / December 2019

Hundred Zundert
Nel Aerts
Posture Editions - 25.00€ -

Nel Aerts (b. 1987) moves in a freely, intuitive way between different media as painting, drawing, collage, performance and sculpture. Since a few years she focuses more often on the portrait-genre, which she visualises on paper or on wooden panels, with careful attention to the different qualities of each material. As such, she is creating a large collection (family almost) of posing subjects caught between abstract patterns and hard-edged figuration. The figures she portraits refer to both popular culture and her direct, everyday surroundings.

The self-portraits are tragicomic in the sense of the contrasts they evoke. Alternately they are desperate or funny, extra- or introverted, thought- or playful carved from wood or originated as a collage, but they are always introspective and self-relativistic.

In Hundred Zundert, “Nel Aerts evokes a visual rendezvous with Vincent van Gogh and sets the tone for the near one hundred drawings that would be made during her three-month residency at the Van Gogh House in Zundert. Rather than ‘following in the footsteps of Van Gogh’, Aerts is interested in examining the mud and earth around them by (literally) placing herself in the environment of Van Gogh’s youth. The resulting work is characterised by a deceptive interplay between formal simplicity and playfulness which belies a substantial complexity. (…) Nel Aerts’s working process is uncomplicated and free of any pretension: black ball pen (dozens), sheets of white A4 paper (hundreds) and spontaneous, almost naive line work (in seemingly infinite supply) are the building blocks of a story that is nevertheless rich in visual and intimate detail, a story that teeters between seriousness and playfulness, at once both comical and deeply emotive.” From: ‘Portrait of the Artist’, Grete Simkuté, in: Hundred Zundert.

Nº 19 / April 2016

Time and Tide
Lisa Spilliaert
Posture Editions - 20.00€ -

“In selecting the photographs for this publication, Lisa Spilliaert (b. 1990) was adamant that the image of a sunrise should be among the first in her book. It is, indeed, an emblematic image. For anyone with a camera, such a splendid sunrise is an irresistible trope: a visual motif that simply begs to be captured and fixed on film. In reality, however, the magic of this scene resides in the fleeting, subtle changes in colours and vibrations. This is the dynamic that captivates us.

Photography is usually understood as a technique for ‘stopping’ the flow of time. But as Spilliaert here demonstrates, the impact of photography can also be used to manifest an awareness of time and transience. By accentuating the photographer’s fixed position vis-à-vis the endlessly changing light source, Spilliaert evokes a correlation between stasis and movement, between the cosmic and the mundane. This duality is echoed again in the confrontation of the two equivalent silhouettes: that of the photographer and of his alias or ‘partner’: a life-size technical camera.” — From ‘Time and Tide’ Edwin Carels

Nº 13 / December 2014

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